Woman, 30, beheaded in Afghanistan for entering a city to go shopping without her husband


 

  • The woman was killed after going to the market in Sar-e-Pul province
  • Her husband was away in Iran when she went shopping for supplies 
  • The area is still under Taliban control 
  • Under Taliban rule women are prohibited from leaving their homes unless accompanied by a close male relative

A woman has reportedly been beheaded by a group of armed men in Afghanistan after she entered a city without her husband.

The horrific act took place in the remote village of Latti in Sar-e-Pul province, which is under Taliban control.

Provincial Governor spokesman Zabiullah Amani told the Nation that the 30-year-old woman was targeted because she went out alone without her husband, who is in Iran.

The Middle East Press reported the woman had gone to the market to shop.

Under Taliban rule women are prohibited from leaving their homes unless accompanied by a close male relative.

They are also banned from working or education and are forced to wear the burqa.

The Taliban have rejected any involvement in this latest incident.

Earlier this month five female Afghan guards working in the airport in southern Kandahar were killed by unknown gunmen as they were on their way to work, the latest in a string of attacks against women in Afghanistan.

 

From bomb attacks to targeted or honour killings or domestic abuses, Afghan women have borne the brunt of the 15 years of conflicts during the Taliban-led insurgency as security has deteriorated and violence has increased in most parts of the country.

Samim Khpulwak, spokesman for the governor of Kandahar, said the five women were in charge of searching female travelers at the Kandahar airport, and had been hired by a private security company.

‘Two gunmen on motorbike followed their van and opened fire on them, killing the five and their driver this morning, said Samim.

Although Afghan women had made hard-fought rights gains in education and work since the collapse of austere Taliban regime in 2001, there are growing fears that these could reverse with the deterioration of security and increase in violence.

Despite years of pressure by women’s groups and foreign donors, Afghanistan remains one of the most difficult places to be a woman.

Restoring fundamental women’s rights was one of the main objectives of the international community in Afghanistan, where the hardline Taliban Islamist banned girls from school and women from work in their rule from 1996-2001.

Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/

 



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